artificial photosynthesis, batteries from wood, everyday chemicals health risks


Dunwei Wang, Associate Professor of Chemistry, Boston College.

Dunwei Wang, Associate Professor of Chemistry, Boston College.

Major breakthrough in the development of artificial photosynthesis

Dunwei Wang, Associate Professor of Chemistry, Boston College and his research group have achieved a series of breakthroughs in their efforts to develop an economical means of harnessing artificial photosynthesis. The team reported that it had narrowed the voltage gap, to within two-tenths of a volt, between the two crucial processes of oxidation and reduction using unique photoanodes and photocathodes the team created from novel nanowire components and coatings. Read More

 

Scientists make environmental friendly batteries from wood.

Scientists make environmental friendly batteries from wood.

Scientists make environmental friendly batteries from wood

Latest publication by American Chemical Society describes the development of a battery made from a sliver of wood coated with tin that shows promise for becoming a tiny, long-lasting, efficient and environmentally friendly energy source. The publication is based on a report by Liangbing Hu, PhD, and Teng Li, PhD. in ACS’ journal Nano Letters. Read More

 
 

New research predicts health risks of everyday chemicals.

New research predicts health risks of everyday chemicals.

New research predicts health risks of everyday chemicals

Concern over the safety of everyday household products, such as baby bottles and soaps, has spurred a wide-ranging research effort into predicting the health risks of tens of thousands of chemicals.Britt E Erickson, Senior Editor, C&EN points out that the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is charged with overseeing the safety of chemicals in consumer products. It’s a monumental task — an estimated 80,000 chemicals are on the market in some form, whether in plastics, detergents, electronics or other items. Read More

Dye based solar cells, Antibiotic resistance drugs, broccoli fights cancer


Weaving in and out of the stripes of dye in this solar cell are metallic threads, printed onto a square of tracing paper that fits in the palm of one hand.

dye-based solar cells

Towards development of dye-based solar cells

UW-Madison researchers working at the intersection of basic and applied science focus on key factors like cost, environmental impacts … and colour. Researchers at the lab of Trisha Andrew, Assistant Chemistry, UW-Madison; are developing next-generation solar cells using chromophores or, in lay terms, dyes. Read More

 

From left Gerry Wright with members of his lab involved in the study.

From left Gerry Wright with members of his lab involved in the study.

Antibiotic resistance, a successful pathway for new drugs

In the battle against antibiotic resistant bacteria, McMaster researchers have found resistance itself is a successful pathway for discovering new antibiotic drugs. “In essence, we’ve made resistance useful instead of a scary problem,” said Gerry Wright, Professor and Scientific director of the Michael G DeGroote, Institute for Infectious Disease Research. Read More

 
 

Scientists increase cancer-fighting potential of broccoli.

Scientists increase cancer-fighting potential of broccoli.

Scientists increase cancer-fighting potential of broccoli

Spraying a plant hormone on broccoli boosts its cancer-fighting potential, and researchers have new insights on how that works. The research could help scientists build an even better, more healthful broccoli.The findings were published in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural & Food Chemistry. Read More

2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Gelatin in fuel cells, foam-like polymer


Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel win Nobel prize 2013 for their contributions to the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems.

Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel

Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel 2013 chemistry Nobel Prize

The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for 2013 was awarded to Martin Karplus, Universite de Strasbourg, France and Harvard University, Cambridge, US; Michael Levitt, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California, US; and Arieh Warshel University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California, US – “for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems.” Read More

 

Dr Zoe Schnepp, University of Birmingham.

Dr Zoe Schnepp, University of Birmingham.

Gelatin can replace platinum in fuel cells, finds new study

New research by researchers at University of Birmingham has found that a substance made from gelatin could be used to replace platinum in fuel cells. The research is published in the Royal Society of Chemistry Journal of Materials Chemistry A. The Birmingham chemists have combined gelatin – the same gelatin that is used to make jelly – with iron and magnesium to create a material that performs almost as well as a commercial platinum catalyst, but is considerably cheaper.Read More

 

Mitchell Anthamatten, Chemical Engineer, University of Rochester.

Mitchell Anthamatten, Chemical Engineer, University of Rochester.

Newly developed process for foam-like polymer coatings

Polymers, the essential component of plastics, are found in countless commercial, medical, and industrial products. Polymers that are porous are called foam polymers and are especially useful because they combine light weight with rigid mechanical properties. Now a researcher at the University of Rochester has developed a process to grow highly customizable coatings of foam-like polymers. Read More

Cheaper hydrogen fuel, propylene on Saturn’s moon, new way to attack flu viruses


Hydrogen is combined with oxygen inside this fuel cell to create the electricity to power the car.

cheaper hydrogen fuels

Research towards making hydrogen fuels cheaper

A small British firm is looking forward to a day in which we will take our cars to the garage and fill them with hydrogen. Acal Energy, based in Runcorn in Cheshire, UK has developed a chemistry that could make hydrogen fuel cells much cheaper and longer-lasting than current technologies. Read more

 

Propylene, the key ingredient in household plastic containers, has been discovered in the atmosphere of Saturn’s smoggy moon, Titan.

propylene on Saturn’s moon, Titan

NASA’s Cassini spacecraft finds propylene on Saturn’s moon, Titan

The key ingredient in household plastic containers, propylene, has been discovered in the atmosphere of Saturn’s smoggy moon Titan — marking more firsts for planetary science. It’s the first time this particular hydrocarbon has been detected on a world beyond Earth, and it’s the first new molecule to be identified by the Cassini orbiter’s Composite Infrared Spectrometer. Read more

 

A chemical compound binds to and inhibits the active site of an enzyme that the influenza virus uses during replication.

new way to attack flu viruses

Researchers find new way to attack flu viruses

A new way to attack flu viruses is taking shape in laboratories at Rutgers University, where scientists have identified chemical agents that block the virus’s ability to replicate itself in cell culture. These novel compounds show promise for a new class of antiviral medicines to fight much-feared pandemic influenzas such as the looming “bird flu” threats caused by the H5N1 influenza A virus and the new H7N9 virus responsible for a 2013 outbreak in China.   Read more