device splits water into hydrogen, exceptional graphene, bacteria increases immunity, cocaine detection


New inexpensive device splits water into hydrogen, oxygen

New inexpensive device splits water into hydrogen, oxygen

This image shows two electrodes connected via an external voltage source splitting water into oxygen (O2) and hydrogen (H2).

Researchers at Stanford University have developed an inexpensive device that uses light to split water into oxygen and clean-burning hydrogen. The goal is to supplement solar cells with hydrogen-powered fuel cells that can generate electricity when the sun isn’t shining or demand is high. Scientists have created a silicon-based water splitter that is both low-cost and corrosion-free. The novel device – a silicon semiconductor coated in an ultrathin layer of nickel – could help pave the way for large-scale production of clean hydrogen fuel from sunlight, according to the scientists. Read More

 

 

 

Scientists create large graphene with exceptional electrical properties

Scientists create large graphene with exceptional electrical properties

Rodney S Ruoff, Professor, Cockrell School of Engineering.

When it comes to the growth of graphene – an ultrathin, ultrastrong, all-carbon material – it is survival of the fittest, according to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin.The team used surface oxygen to grow centimetre-size single graphene crystals on copper. The crystals were about 10,000 times as large as the largest crystals from only four years ago. Very large single crystals have exceptional electrical properties.Read More

 

 

Gut bacteria increases immunity

Gut bacteria increases immunity

In a mouse model for experimental colitis, a diet supplemented with butyric acid leads to decreased infiltration of inflammatory cells

New research from the RIKEN Centre for Integrative Medical Sciences in Japan sheds light on the role of gut bacteria on the maturation of the immune system and provides evidence supporting the use of butyrate as therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s disease.The study shows that butyrate, a by-product of the digestion of dietary fibre by gut microbes, acts as an epigenetic switch that boosts the immune system by inducing the production of regulatory T cells in the gut.Read More

 

 

 

New promising method to detect cocaine in biofluids

New promising method to detect cocaine in biofluids

Cocaine may permanently damage proteins in the body.

A new study on cocaine, details how it may permanently damage proteins in the body. According to scientists, the information, gleaned from laboratory tests, could be used to potentially detect the drug in biofluids for weeks or months – instead of days – after use. The findings, which appear in the ACS journal Chemical Research in Toxicology, could also help explain cocaine’s long-term health effects.Read More

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