Tattoo like sensors can detect glucose levels


Newly discovered inorganic material can emit laser light in solution

 inorganic material

inorganic material

A team of researchers from the National Research Council (CSIC) and the Akademie Ved Ceske Republiky (Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic) has discovered a new type of inorganic material (no carbon) that can emit laser light in solution; it is a complex of boron and hydrogen. Read More 

 

 

Towards cheaper, lighter rechargeable battery for electric vehicles

rechargeable battery

rechargeable battery

A next-generation cheaper, lighter and more powerful rechargeable battery for electric vehicles is one step closer to reality. The discovery of a material that maintains a rechargeable sulphur cathode helps to overcome a primary hurdle to building a lithium-sulphur (Li-S) battery. Such a battery can theoretically power an electric car three times further than current lithium-ion batteries for the same weight, at a much lower cost, said researchers. Read More

 

Gold nanoparticles may help in early detection of heart attacks

Gold nanoparticles

Gold nanoparticles

NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering professors have been collaborating with researchers from Peking University on a new test strip that is demonstrating great potential for the early detection of certain heart attacks. Read More 

 

 

 

Tattoo like sensors can detect glucose levels

Tattoo

Tattoo

Scientists have developed the first ultra-thin, flexible device that sticks to skin like a rub-on tattoo and can detect a person’s glucose levels. The sensor, reported in a proof-of-concept study in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry, has the potential to eliminate finger-pricking for many people with diabetes. Read More 

 

Scientists solve organic semiconductor mystery

semiconductor mystery

semiconductor mystery

Organic semiconductors are prized for light emitting diodes (LEDs), field effect transistors (FETs) and photovoltaic cells. As they can be printed from solution, they provide a highly scalable, cost-effective alternative to silicon-based devices. Uneven performances, Read More

 

 

 

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Nasal spray may treat Alzheimer’s, say scientists


Nasal spray may treat Alzheimer’s, say scientists

Nasal spray

Nasal spray

A nasal spray that contains a man-made form of insulin may improve working memory and other mental capabilities in adults with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s, scientists have found. The study led by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center studied 60 adults diagnosed with amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild to moderate Alzheimer’s dementia (AD). Read More

 

New catalyst process for rapid polymerization uses light, not metal

rapid polymerization

rapid polymerization

University of California Santa Barbara researchers develop a metal-free atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) process that uses an organic-based photocatalyst. A team of chemistry and materials science experts from University of California, Santa Barbara and The Dow Chemical Company has created a novel way to overcome one of the major hurdles preventing the widespread use of controlled radical polymerization. Read More 

 

‘Nanowire’ crystals with superconducting properties developed

Nanowire’ crystal

Nanowire’ crystal

A new type of ‘nanowire’ crystals that fuses semiconducting and metallic materials on the atomic scale could lay the foundation for future semiconducting electronics. Researchers at the University of Copenhagen are behind the breakthrough, published inNature Materials, which has great potential. Read More 

 

Researchers use glass for battery electrode

battery electrode

battery electrode

Today’s lithium-ion batteries are good, but not good enough if our future energy system is to rely on electrical power. Chemists and materials scientists at ETH Zurich have developed a type of glass that can be used as an electrode material in lithium-ion batteries – likely making a vast improvement in these batteries’ capacity and energy density. Read More 

 

Super-dipoles

Super-dipoles

Super-dipoles linked to chloroform’s outstanding solvent properties

Super-dipoles uncovered in chloroform by chemists in the UK could explain the solvent’s powerful ability to dissolve a large range of substances at high concentrations.  Read More 

 

Scientists create first new antibiotic in nearly three decades


New method to detect estrogen, could improve cancer research

estrogen

estrogen

Scientists at the Shimadzu Institute for Research Technologies and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at The University of Texas at Arlington have collaborated to develop a new method for detecting trace amounts of estrogen in small samples that holds the potential to improve research into cancer and other diseases. Read More

 

Novel nanowire clothing could keep people warm

Novel nanowire

Novel nanowire

To stay warm when temperatures drop outside, we heat our indoor spaces – even when no one is in them. But scientists have now developed a novel nanowire coating for clothes that can both generate heat and trap the heat from our bodies better than regular clothes. They report on their technology, which could help us reduce our reliance on conventional energy sources, in the ACS journal Nano Letters. Read More 

Scientists create first new antibiotic in nearly three decades

new antibiotic

new antibiotic

In a massive breakthrough, scientists have created the first new antibiotic in more than three decades, Teixobactin, that can treat many common bacterial infections such as tuberculosis, septicemia and C Diff or clostridium difficile colitis. Read More 

 

Developing light-activated nanocarrier to transport proteins into cells

nanocarrier

nanocarrier

University of California, Santa Barbara’s (UCSB) Reich Group uses lasers to spatially and temporally control the release of a tagged protein inside a cell. Optogenetics, which uses light to control cellular events, is poised to become an important technology in molecular biology and beyond Read More 

 

Beer digesting bacteria may fight against diseases, finds new study

beer

beer

A recent study led by Harry Gilbert, professor of biochemistry at Newcastle University, Eric Martens of the University of Michigan’s Department of Microbiology and Immunology, and Wade Abbott, research scientist at Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, has identified the complex machinery that targets yeast carbohydrates Read More

Mistletoe may fight obesity-related liver disease


cyclic copper complex

cyclic copper complex

Newly discovered cyclic copper complex converts carbon dioxide to oxalate

LSU researchers are contributing to ongoing work aimed at reducing the amount of carbon dioxide released in the environment. The research team, led by Andrew Maverick, Philip & Foymae West Distinguished Professor of Chemistry and acting associate dean in the LSU College of Science, has discovered a cyclic copper complex that converts carbon dioxide to oxalate, changing the environmental pollutant into a more useful organic compound Read More

 

Mistletoe

Mistletoe

Mistletoe may fight obesity-related liver disease

Mistletoe may have better effect on liver health. Researchers have found that a compound produced by a particular variety of the plant can help fight obesity-related liver disease in mice. Their study appears in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry Read More

 

 

rare-earth separation process

rare-earth separation process

Improving rare-earth separation process

US Department of Energy’s Ames Laboratory and Critical Materials Institute materials chemist Anja Mudring is harnessing the promising qualities of ionic liquids, salts in a liquid state, to optimize processes for critical materials. Read More

 

 

superconductors

superconductors

Hydrogen-rich compounds are better superconductors under extreme pressure

Hydrogen-rich compounds under extreme pressure may be better superconductors than the best conventional ones around, according to scientists in Germany. The results suggest metallic hydrogen-based compounds may offer up to 50 times less electrical resistivity than copper and conduct at -83°C, the highest recorded temperature for a hydrogen-rich superconductor. The best superconductors in existence today stop working at -109°C. Read More

 

nitric oxide

nitric oxide

Encapsulating nitric oxide within metal-organic frameworks

A group of scientists led by researchers at the Universite de Versailles’ Institut Lavoisier in France has worked out how to stably gift-wrap a chemical gas known as nitric oxide within metal-organic frameworks Read More