Chewing gum can remove oral bacteria, finds new study


Chewing gum can remove oral bacteria, finds new study

Chewing gum

Chewing gum

Just 10 minutes of chewing gum can remove 100 million bacteria from your mouth, according to a new study which suggests chewing gum may be as good as flossing. Researchers at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands found that chewing gum can trap and remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Read more 

 

Researchers find new method to unboil egg whites

unboil egg whites

unboil egg whites

University of California Irvine (UCI) and Australian chemists have figured out how to unboil egg whites – an innovation that could dramatically reduce costs for cancer treatments, food production and other segments of the $160 billion global biotechnology industry, according to findings published today in the journal ChemBioChem. Read more 

 

Scientists create ‘bulletproof’ batteries

bulletproof

bulletproof

New battery technology from the University of Michigan should be able to prevent the kind of fires that grounded Boeing 787 Dreamliners in 2013. The innovation is an advanced barrier between the electrodes in a lithium-ion battery. Made with nanofibers extracted from Kevlar, the tough material in bulletproof vests, the barrier stifles the growth of metal tendrils that can become unwanted pathways for electrical current. Read More 

 

Carbon balls can contribute to sustainable energy system

Carbon balls

Carbon balls

Researchers at Chalmers have discovered that the insulation plastic used in high-voltage cables can withstand a 26 per cent higher voltage if nanometer-sized carbon balls are added. This could result in enormous efficiency gains in the power grids of the future, which are needed to achieve a sustainable energy system Read More

 

New colour-changing film can detect chemical weapons

chemical weapons

chemical weapons

In today’s world, in which the threat of terrorism looms, there is an urgent need for fast, reliable tools to detect the release of deadly chemical warfare agents (CWAs). In the journal ACS Macro Letters, scientists are reporting new progress toward thin-film materials that could rapidly change colours in the presence of CWAs — an advance that could help save lives and hold aggressors accountable. Read More 

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