Chewing gum can remove oral bacteria, finds new study


Chewing gum can remove oral bacteria, finds new study

Chewing gum

Chewing gum

Just 10 minutes of chewing gum can remove 100 million bacteria from your mouth, according to a new study which suggests chewing gum may be as good as flossing. Researchers at the University of Groningen in the Netherlands found that chewing gum can trap and remove bacteria from the oral cavity. Read more 

 

Researchers find new method to unboil egg whites

unboil egg whites

unboil egg whites

University of California Irvine (UCI) and Australian chemists have figured out how to unboil egg whites – an innovation that could dramatically reduce costs for cancer treatments, food production and other segments of the $160 billion global biotechnology industry, according to findings published today in the journal ChemBioChem. Read more 

 

Scientists create ‘bulletproof’ batteries

bulletproof

bulletproof

New battery technology from the University of Michigan should be able to prevent the kind of fires that grounded Boeing 787 Dreamliners in 2013. The innovation is an advanced barrier between the electrodes in a lithium-ion battery. Made with nanofibers extracted from Kevlar, the tough material in bulletproof vests, the barrier stifles the growth of metal tendrils that can become unwanted pathways for electrical current. Read More 

 

Carbon balls can contribute to sustainable energy system

Carbon balls

Carbon balls

Researchers at Chalmers have discovered that the insulation plastic used in high-voltage cables can withstand a 26 per cent higher voltage if nanometer-sized carbon balls are added. This could result in enormous efficiency gains in the power grids of the future, which are needed to achieve a sustainable energy system Read More

 

New colour-changing film can detect chemical weapons

chemical weapons

chemical weapons

In today’s world, in which the threat of terrorism looms, there is an urgent need for fast, reliable tools to detect the release of deadly chemical warfare agents (CWAs). In the journal ACS Macro Letters, scientists are reporting new progress toward thin-film materials that could rapidly change colours in the presence of CWAs — an advance that could help save lives and hold aggressors accountable. Read More 

Ten new antibodies developed in battle against cancer


Ten new antibodies developed in battle against cancer

Ten new antibodies

Ten new antibodies

Researchers from Aarhus University in Denmark have developed ten new antibodies that can be used in the battle against cancer. These antibodies work by inhibiting the body’s blood vessel formation close to the tumour which is, thereby, cut off from oxygen and nutrient supply. In lab tests over mice, the team have succeeded in using these antibodies to stop the development of malignant tumours. Read More

 

New drug could protect against nuclear radiation exposure

nuclear radiation exposure

nuclear radiation exposure

The 2011 Fukushima disaster was a stark reminder of the continuing dangers posed by nuclear fallout, highlighting the need for an approved drug that can be taken after radiation exposure to protect against organ injury and death. Read More

 

 

Scientists develop cost effective, self-cleaning electrochemical sensor

electrochemical sensor

electrochemical sensor

Scientists in Italy have engineered a cheap and simple electrochemical sensor that cleans itself when exposed to ultraviolet light. Their system offers a route towards self-cleaning electrodes with myriad environmental and biomedical sensing applications – from detecting pollutants in water to monitoring medications in blood. Read More 

 

‘Predicted’ zeolites may fuel efficient processes

zeolites

zeolites

Scientists at Rice University and the University of Minnesota have identified synthetic materials that may purify ethanol more efficiently and greatly improve the separation of long-chain hydrocarbons in petroleum refining. Read More

 

 

Scientists explain alkali metal explosion

alkali metal explosion

alkali metal explosion

The chemistry behind dropping sodium into water and watching it explode may require a rethink, according to scientists in the Czech Republic. They say the violent reaction may be triggered not by the ignition of hydrogen gas, as previously thought, but by large charge instabilities within the metal. Read More 

Efficient manganese catalyst converts light to chemical energy


Drinking beer may reduce risk of developing heart failure, claims new research

Drinking beer

Drinking beer

Drinking half a pint of beer a day may lower your risk of developing heart failure, a new large-scale study has claimed. The study of nearly 15,000 men and women found that drinking up to seven drinks a week in early to middle age is associated with a 20 per cent lower risk of men developing heart failure in the future when compared to teetotallers. A more modest 16 per cent reduced risk for women was also observed, said researchers. Read More

 

Converting ash for use in nuclear waste treatment, soil remediation

ash

ash

Scientists suggest a new method to transform power plant ash into materials that could be used for nuclear waste treatment or soil remediation. The world’s power plants produce about 600 million tonne of coal ash every year. If nothing is done about it, this sort of waste might damage the environment. A group of scientists from Greece and Romania suggests a method to turn the ashes produced into an eco-friendly solution. Read More

 

Efficient manganese catalyst converts light to chemical energy

manganese catalyst

manganese catalyst

Scientists at the Helmholtz Center for Materials and Energy (HZB) in collaboration with the School of Chemistry and ARC Centre of Excellence for Electromaterials Science at Monash University, Australia, have precisely characterized a manganese catalyst’s electronic states. The catalyst is capable of converting light to chemical energy. Read more

 

Self-cleaning, self-powered smart keyboard identifies computer users

smart keyboard

smart keyboard

In a novel twist in cybersecurity, scientists have developed a self-cleaning, self-powered smart keyboard that can identify computer users by the way they type. The device, reported in the journalACS Nano, could help prevent unauthorized users from gaining direct access to computers. Read mOre

 

 

DNA ‘glue’ could be used to grow tissues, organs


Scientists solve organic semiconductor mystery

organic semiconductor mystery

organic semiconductor mystery

Organic semiconductors are prized for light emitting diodes (LEDs), field effect transistors (FETs) and photovoltaic cells. As they can be printed from solution, they provide a highly scalable, cost-effective alternative to silicon-based devices. Uneven performances, however, have been a persistent problem Read More 

 

Triggering rearrangement of chemical particles for efficient medical treatments

chemical particles

chemical particles

More efficient medical treatments could be developed thanks to a new method for triggering the rearrangement of chemical particles. The new method, developed at the University of Warwick, uses two ‘parent’ nanoparticles that are designed to interact only when in proximity to each other and trigger the release of drug molecules contained within both. Read More 

 

DNA ‘glue’ could be used to grow tissues, organs

DNA ‘glue’

DNA ‘glue’

DNA molecules provide the “source code” for life in humans, plants, animals and some microbes. But now researchers report an initial study showing that the strands can also act as a glue to hold together 3-D-printed materials that could someday be used to grow tissues and organs in the lab Read More 

 

 

New antimicrobial coatings with long-term germ resistance

antimicrobial coatings

antimicrobial coatings

Researchers at the INM have now produced antimicrobial abrasion-resistant coatings with both silver and copper colloids with a long-term effect that kill germs reliably and at the same time prevent germs becoming established. The coatings are particularly suitable for the application on large and solid surfaces, on doorhandles and for textiles. Read More

 

Super-strong, ultra-thin graphene batteries lasts longer

graphene batteries

graphene batteries

Graphene has been called a “wonder material” and a new process to develop the super-strong, ultra-thin material could make batteries last a lot longer. The new technology was discovered by South Korean scientists who exposed small amounts of graphene, a material made from pure carbon and 200 times stronger than steel, to a process that’s a lot like deep-frying chicken. Read More 

 

Tattoo like sensors can detect glucose levels


Newly discovered inorganic material can emit laser light in solution

 inorganic material

inorganic material

A team of researchers from the National Research Council (CSIC) and the Akademie Ved Ceske Republiky (Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic) has discovered a new type of inorganic material (no carbon) that can emit laser light in solution; it is a complex of boron and hydrogen. Read More 

 

 

Towards cheaper, lighter rechargeable battery for electric vehicles

rechargeable battery

rechargeable battery

A next-generation cheaper, lighter and more powerful rechargeable battery for electric vehicles is one step closer to reality. The discovery of a material that maintains a rechargeable sulphur cathode helps to overcome a primary hurdle to building a lithium-sulphur (Li-S) battery. Such a battery can theoretically power an electric car three times further than current lithium-ion batteries for the same weight, at a much lower cost, said researchers. Read More

 

Gold nanoparticles may help in early detection of heart attacks

Gold nanoparticles

Gold nanoparticles

NYU Polytechnic School of Engineering professors have been collaborating with researchers from Peking University on a new test strip that is demonstrating great potential for the early detection of certain heart attacks. Read More 

 

 

 

Tattoo like sensors can detect glucose levels

Tattoo

Tattoo

Scientists have developed the first ultra-thin, flexible device that sticks to skin like a rub-on tattoo and can detect a person’s glucose levels. The sensor, reported in a proof-of-concept study in the ACS journal Analytical Chemistry, has the potential to eliminate finger-pricking for many people with diabetes. Read More 

 

Scientists solve organic semiconductor mystery

semiconductor mystery

semiconductor mystery

Organic semiconductors are prized for light emitting diodes (LEDs), field effect transistors (FETs) and photovoltaic cells. As they can be printed from solution, they provide a highly scalable, cost-effective alternative to silicon-based devices. Uneven performances, Read More