Academic News

Thorium Concept Car.

Thorium fuel car runs for 100 years without refueling!

Laser Power Systems (LPS) from Connecticut, US, is developing a new method of automotive propulsion with thorium, one of the most dense materials known in nature. Thorium is so dense that it has the potential to produce tremendous amounts of heat.

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Shannon Boettcher, left, and Fuding Lin of the University of Oregon

New study illustrates the working of solar water-splitting cells

University of Oregon scientists have provided new insight into how solar water-splitting cells work, with the help of a new method called “dual-electrode photoelectrochemistry.” The most important parameter reported was the ion-permeability of electrocatalysts used in water-splitting devices.

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Major breakthrough in MRI technology for screening liquids

Scientists at Los Alamos National Lab have advanced a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) technology that may provide a breakthrough for screening liquids at airport security. They have achieved a new detection technology by adding low-power X-ray data to the mix. The new system is named MagRay.

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nuts, death riskEating nuts reduces death risks

According to a latest study, people who ate a daily handful of nuts were 20 per cent less likely to die from any cause over a 30-year period than those who didn’t consume nuts, say scientists from the Harvard-affiliated Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

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New promising method to detect cocaine in biofluids

New promising method to detect cocaine in biofluids

WASHINGTON, US: A new study on cocaine, details how it may permanently damage proteins in the body. According to scientists, the information, gleaned from laboratory tests, could be used to potentially detect the drug in biofluids for weeks or months – instead of days – after use. The findings, which appear in the ACS journal Chemical Research in Toxicology, could also help explain cocaine’s long-term health effects.

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A diet supplemented with butyric acid leads to decreased infiltration of inflammatory cells.

Gut bacteria increases immunity

SAITAMA, JAPAN: New research from the RIKEN Centre for Integrative Medical Sciences in Japan sheds light on the role of gut bacteria on the maturation of the immune system and provides evidence supporting the use of butyrate as therapy for inflammatory bowel diseases like Crohn’s disease.

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Rodney S Ruoff, Professor, Cockrell School of Engineering.

Scientists create large graphene with exceptional electrical properties

When it comes to the growth of graphene – an ultrathin, ultrastrong, all-carbon material – it is survival of the fittest, according to researchers at The University of Texas at Austin. The team used surface oxygen to grow centimetre-size single graphene crystals on copper. The crystals were about 10,000 times as large as the largest crystals from only four years ago. Very large single crystals have exceptional electrical properties.

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splitting water

Electrodes connected via an external voltage source splitting water into oxygen and hydrogen

New inexpensive device splits water into hydrogen, oxygen

CALIFORNIA, US: Researchers at Stanford University have developed an inexpensive device that uses light to split water into oxygen and clean-burning hydrogen. The goal is to supplement solar cells with hydrogen-powered fuel cells that can generate electricity when the sun isn’t shining or demand is high.

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titanium dioxide, sunscreen

Researchers are making common cosmetic and sunblock ingredients safer.

Making cosmetics, sunscreens safer…

WASHINGTON DC, US: Use of a particular type of titanium dioxide, a common ingredient in cosmetics, food products, toothpaste and sunscreen, could reduce the potential health risks associated with the widely used compound.

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magnesium, fuels

new method for transportation that would be 50 % more energy efficient.

Magnesium drawn from oceans may reduce fuel use, finds new study

A lightweight metal that reduces fuel use in cars and planes could be extracted from the ocean through a unique process being developed at the Department of Energy’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The process could ultimately make fuel-efficient transportation more affordable and expand the American magnesium market. PNNL is leading a $2.7 million, three-year project to develop a novel method that removes naturally occurring magnesium from seawater.

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This model of the guanidinium chloride salt (blue and silver) in solution shows carbon (yellow) and water (green).

Positively charged ions attract each other in aqueous solution

CALIFORNIA, US: “Opposite charges attract and like charges repel,” is a universal scientific truth. A research team led by Richard Saykally, Lab Chemist, Berkeley and theorist David Prendergast, working at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), has shown that, when hydrated in water, positively charged ions (cations) can actually pair up with one another.

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(From left) Chris Verschoor, Dawn Bowdish, Maya Farha and Eric Brown, Professor.

Research towards fighting antibiotic-resistant bacteria

ONTARIO, CANADA: Researchers at McMaster University are using a new approach to fighting antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The technique involves researchers in the Michael G DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research targeting the cell membranes of MRSA – a bacteria responsible for increasing the number of life-threatening infections both in hospitals and communities.

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paralysis in silkworm causes large-scale production of silks with tailor-made properties.

Paralysis of silkworm promises better silk technology

OXFORD, UK: Oxford University researchers have harnessed the natural defence mechanism of silkworms, which causes paralysis, in what is a major step towards the large-scale production of silks with tailor-made properties.

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insect wings, proteins

Proteins in insect wings finds use in medicine.

Proteins in insect wings finds use in medicine

WASHINGTON DC, US: The remarkable, rubber-like protein that enables dragonflies, grasshoppers and other insects to flap their wings, jump and chirp has major potential uses in medicine, scientists concluded in an article in the journal ACS Macro Letters. It evaluates the latest advances toward using a protein called resilin in nanosprings, biorubbers, biosensors and other applications.

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atomic interactions

The image demonstrates the principle of measurement which enables to address atom-specific and state-dependent emission of photons.

Scientists provide details of interactions on the atomic scale

BERLIN, GERMANY: How exactly atoms and molecules in biochemical solutions or at solid-liquid interfaces do interact, is a question of great importance. A groundbreaking work by HZB-scientists provides a new tool, which enables scientists to get a “fingerprint” of the interactions on the atomic scale. In collaboration with the group of theoretical physicist Oliver Kuhn, University of Rostock these fingerprints can be interpreted and linked to specific chemical interactions, thus allowing direct insight in what happens in the former ‘black box.’

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antibacterial coating

Phillip B Messersmith, Professor, Northwestern University.

New antibacterial coating based on plant polyphenols

EVANSTON, US: Researchers at Northwestern University, with a simple kitchen sink experiment, discovered that green tea leaves make an excellent antibacterial coating. And so can red wine, dark chocolate and cacao beans. It’s the powerful and healthful polyphenols at work in a new way. Polyphenols, the naturally occurring molecules found in plants, has functions of structural support and defense against bacteria and oxidative damage.

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turmeric, thalidomide

Scientists say that, a hybrid of turmeric and thalidomide can kill cancer cells.

Hybrid of turmeric, thalidomide to kill cancer cells

VIRGINIA, US: Researchers have combined structural features from anti-nausea drug thalidomide with common kitchen spice turmeric to create hybrid molecules that effectively kill multiple myeloma cells. The preclinical study is recently published by the journal Organic & Biomolecular Chemistry, Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Centre.

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graphene, platinum

A field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) image of 3D honeycomb-structured graphene.

Scientists reduce cost of dye-sensitized solar cells

MICHIGAN, US: Dye-sensitized solar cells are thin, flexible, easy to make and very good at turning sunshine into electricity. Major drawback is the use of key ingredient which is the most expensive metals on the planet: platinum. Scientists at Michigan Technological University are trying to overcome this.

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antimicrobial surface, bacteria

Scientists at EPFL have developed a new method for making antimicrobial surfaces that can eliminate bacteria under a minute.

Scientists develop new antimicrobial surfaces

LAUSANNE, SWITZERLAND: Scientists at EPFL have developed a new method for making antimicrobial surfaces that can eliminate bacteria under a minute. The technology has been tested in hospital and shows enormous potential for preventing hospital-acquired infections.

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nanoparticles, cancer

Shanta Dhar, Assistant Professor, University of Georgia.

Nanoparticles to recognize, attack cancer cells

GEORGIA, US: Researchers at the University of Georgia are developing a new treatment technique that uses nanoparticles to reprogramme immune cells so they are able to recognize and attack cancer. The findings were published recently in the early online edition of ACS Nano.

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Upsalite, impossible material

Upsalite, the ‘impossible material.’

The ‘impossible material,’ Upsalite, created by Sweden scientists

UPPSALA, SWEDEN: A new material created by Uppsala University can control moisture produced in electronic processes and could even help to clean up dangerous chemical and oil spills. This ‘impossible material’ called upsalite is a very porous alkali earth metal carbonate and has set records for both surface area and water absorption.

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Mona Lisa, nanotechnology

Georgia Tech researchers have created the ‘Mini Lisa’ on a substrate surface approximately 30 microns in width.

Nanotechnology paints Mona Lisa on 30 microns width

GEORGIA, US: Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have “painted” the Mona Lisa on a substrate surface approximately 30 microns in width (one-third the width of a human hair). This demonstrates a technique that could potentially be used to achieve nanomanufacturing of devices because the team was able to vary the surface concentration of molecules on such short-length scales.

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cultured beef, food revolution

Scientists culture beef in laboratory.

World’s first lab grown beef burger …

LONDON, UK: Mark Post, Professor, Maastricht University has revealed a cultured beef burger at an event in London. As the world’s population grows to an estimated 9 billion by the middle of the century, experts believe even intense livestock farming processes will not be able to match the demand from a growing middle class for meat.

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common cold, infections

Scientists are reporting first broad-spectrum drugs to combat human rhinoviruses.

Research towards broad spectrum drugs for common infectious diseases

WASHINGTON DC, US: Scientists have reported that there is progress in the search for the first broad-spectrum drugs to combat human rhinoviruses (HRVs), which cause humanity’s most common infectious diseases.

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split water, sunlight

An artist’s conception of a commercial hydrogen production plant that uses sunlight.

New technique uses sunlight to split water into hydrogen, oxygen

COLORADO, US: A research team by University of Colorado Boulder has developed a radically new technique that uses the power of sunlight to efficiently split water into its components of hydrogen and oxygen, paving the way for the broad use of hydrogen as a clean, green fuel.

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Toothpaste helps prevent plaque and improves cosmetic functions.

Toothpaste… your morning mixture of chemicals

SINGAPORE: Oral hygiene has two important functions – prevent plaque and improves cosmetic functions. There were many methods used in the past to keep the teeth clean. Some ancient people chewed on frayed twigs, while others rubbed their teeth with cloth or swabbed them in vinegar.

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Scientists have used apple and tomato peels to remove different types of pollutants in water.

Apple, tomato peel to purify water

SINGAPORE: Ramakrishna Mallampati, PhD candidate, National University of Singapore (NUS), is trying to make clean water at low cost, as the scarcity of potable water is the most crucial problems affecting the world today. He experimented with water treatment techniques using materials that are easily available, and came up with novel ways to purify water using the peels of apples and tomatoes.

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Toward anti-odor, anti-bacterial fabrics with the scent of vanilla. (C) ACS

New study establishes anti-bacterial, odour-resistant fabrics

WASHINGTON DC, US: A new study has established the feasibility of giving fabrics an anti-bacterial, odour-resistant coating with the fresh scent of vanilla. The technology also could have medical applications in preventing the spread of hospital infections via bed linens and other objects, according to the study, published in the ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research.

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Water transforms into a new form of liquid when supercooled.

Water transforms into a new form of liquid when supercooled

FAYETTEVILLE, US: Researchers at the University of Arkansas have identified that water, when chilled to a very low temperature, transforms into a new form of liquid. Through a simulation performed in ‘supercooled’ water, a research team led by Feng “Seymour” Wang, Chemist, confirmed a “liquid-liquid” phase transition at 207 Kelvins, or 87 degrees below zero on the Fahrenheit scale.

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Acetaminophen is one of the most widely used drugs for pain and fever reduction.

Research towards development of safer form of paracetamol

WASHINGTON DC, US: In an effort to develop a safer form of acetaminophen (paracetamol), researchers have discovered substances that may have less potential toxic effects on the liver. Acetaminophen is one of the most widely used drugs for pain and fever reduction. A report on the research appears in ACS Medicinal Chemistry Letters.

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Fungus Trametes versicolor.

Scientists discover current flow in fungus

FREIBURG IM BREISGAU, GERMANY: Scientists at University of Freiburg, has found a way to make a species of tree fungus useful for the production of electricity. The tree fungus Trametes versicolor provides the cathode of a biofuel cell with a steady supply of the enzyme laccase, thus enabling the fuel cell to react with oxygen.

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A new iron nanoparticle catalyst developed by researchers promises to drastically improve the efficiency of hydrogenation.

Iron catalyst improves the efficiency of hydrogenation

SAITAMA, JAPAN: Researchers have developed a new iron nanoparticle catalyst that will drastically improve the efficiency of hydrogenation, a key chemical process used in a wide array of industrial applications. The new catalyst is cleaner, safer and cheaper than traditional rare metal-based catalysts such as palladium or platinum. The new, more environmentally friendly technique marks a breakthrough for the emerging field of green chemistry.

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An inexpensive new material made of clay and papaya seeds removes harmful metals from water.

Clay, papaya seeds purifies water efficiently

An inexpensive new material made of clay and papaya seeds removes harmful metals from water and could lower the cost of providing clean water to millions of people in the developing world, scientists are reporting. Researcher Emmanuel Unuabonah and colleagues explained that almost one billion people in developing countries lack access to reliable supplies of clean water for drinking, cooking and other key uses.

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Nathaniel Rosi, Associate Professor, University of Pittsburgh.

Drug delivery, gas storage, gas transport made easy and efficient

Chemistry researchers in the University of Pittsburgh have designed a family of materials that could make drug delivery, gas storage and gas transport more efficient and at a lower cost.The recent work builds upon Nathaniel Rosi, Associate Professor, University of Pittsburgh’s earlier research detailing a new class of metal-organic frameworks-crystalline compounds consisting of metal vertices and organic linkers that form porous structures.

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Using the mechanism bacteria use to shrug off powerful antibiotics, scientists have developed solar-powered nanofiltre that remove antibiotics from lakes and rivers

Solar nanofiltres remove antibiotics from water in lakes, rivers

WASHINGTON DC, US: Using the same devious mechanism that enables some bacteria to shrug off powerful antibiotics, scientists have developed solar-powered nanofiltres that remove antibiotics from the water in lakes and rivers twice as efficiently as the best existing technology. Their report appears in ACS’ journal NanoLetters.

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MIT researchers have generated mature liver cells from induced pluripotent stem cells.

Research towards creating artificial liver

MASSACHUSETTS, US: According to Sangeeta Bhatia, Engineer, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the liver can indeed regenerate itself if part of it is removed. However, researchers trying to exploit that ability in hopes of producing artificial liver tissue for transplantation have repeatedly been stymied: Mature liver cells, known as hepatocytes, quickly lose their normal function when removed from the body.

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academic newsSoon, electronic tattoo to replace password of computers, mobile phones

LONDON, UK: Imagine a transparent sticker on your skin that monitors temperature, hydration and strain besides containing passwords that unlock your computer or mobile phone. A biostamp – a thin electronic mesh that stretches with your skin and contains some vital eletronic records is all set to become a reality.

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Florian Nitze, Physicist, Umea University.

Development of formic acid fuel cells

UMEA, SWEDEN: With the technology of today it is possible to use environmental friendly formic acid in fuel cell powering mobile phone or laptop. Florian Nitze, Physicist, Umea University, has in his thesis developed new catalysts to improve the capacity of these fuel cells. Fuel cells are different from batteries in that they require a constant source of fuel and oxygen to run. The technology is already commercially available but formic acid fuel cells still suffer from low power and lifetime.

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Ehud Keinan, Professor, Technion Schulich.

Scientist develop biological computers to manipulate genetic codes

NEW YORK, US: Using only biomolecules (such as DNA and enzymes), scientists at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology have developed and constructed an advanced biological transducer, a computing machine capable of manipulating genetic codes, and using the output as new input for subsequent computations. The breakthrough might someday create new possibilities in biotechnology, including individual gene therapy and cloning. The findings appear in Chemistry & Biology (Cell Press).

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A US company is developing nutritious eggs from plant materials as substitutes for chicken eggs.

Soon… veg eggs a reality

NEW YORK, US: Veg egg! In a good news for vegetarians, a US company said it is developing nutritious eggs from plant materials as substitutes for chicken eggs. For decades, egg substitutes of various types have been around, however, more scientific methods could finally produce new products that actually taste good, said Josh Tetrick, CEO, Hampton Creek Foods; a company based in San Francisco, California, that is developing plant-based egg substitutes.

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Chemistry academic news Washington DC US

Scientists are reporting that unprocessed, raw cotton may be an ideal, ecologically friendly answer, with an amazing ability to sop up oil.

Cotton can clean up oil spills, says new study

WASHINGTON DC, US: With the Deepwater Horizon disaster emphasizing the need for better ways of cleaning up oil spills, scientists are reporting that unprocessed, raw cotton may be an ideal, ecologically friendly answer, with an amazing ability to sop up oil. Their report, which includes some of the first scientific data on unprocessed, raw cotton’s use in crude oil spills, appears in the ACS journal Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research. click here to read completely For more news on Chemistry Academic news visit our worlds best online chemical portal

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According to a new study by George Washington University, nucleation of ice in small droplets is strongly size-dependent, an important conclusion in understanding water’s behaviour at the nanoscale.

Scientists provide better understanding of water’s behaviour at nanoscale

WASHINGTON DC, US: The results of a new study led by Tianshu Li, Professor, George Washington University, provide direct computational evidence that nucleation of ice in small droplets is strongly size-dependent, an important conclusion in understanding water’s behavior at the nanoscale. The formation of ice at the nanoscale is a challenging, basic scientific research question whose answer also has important implications for climate research and other fields. click here for complete academic news

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