laser light, graphene oxide, biologics, chemical camouflage


Laser light on nanoparticle photocell converts sunlight into electricity

Four pulses of laser light on nanoparticle photocells in a University of Oregon spectroscopy experiment has opened a window on how captured sunlight can be converted into electricity… Read more

Graphene oxide paper can improve rechargeable batteries, finds new study

A Kansas State University engineering team has discovered some of graphene oxide’s important properties that can improve sodium- and lithium-ion flexible batteries… Read more

Scientists discover biologics with lesser side effects

Biologics are on the market and under development for many serious illnesses such as cancer, but some of them come with high risks. Now Scientists have produced a novel class of molecules that could be as effective but without the dangerous side effects… Read more

Chemical camouflage helps fish hide from predators

A reef fish can hide from predators by adopting the smell of the coral it eats, according to researchers in Australia. This is the first time that chemical crypsis – the ability of an organism to avoid detection by using odour-based camouflage – has been observed in vertebrates… Read more

 

 

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New hybrid sodium ion capacitor from peanut shells


burger

burger

New method to detect horse meat

chemists have developed a method to distinguish horse meat from beef using a benchtop NMR machine. The new test is quicker, cheaper and simpler than the current gold standard used by food safety bodies. Read more 

 

honeybee hive

honeybee hive

Honeybee hives could hold potential hair loss therapy

Hair loss can be devastating for the millions of men and women who experience it. Now scientists are reporting that a substance from honeybee hives might contain clues for developing a potential new therapy. They found that the material, called propolis, encouraged hair growth in mice. Read More 

 

peanut shells

peanut shells

New hybrid sodium ion capacitor from peanut shells

Scientists in Canada have created a hybrid sodium ion capacitor (NIC) from peanut shells in a pioneering study bridging the gap between conventional ion batteries and supercapacitors. A hybrid ion capacitor is capable of storing charge both electrostatically and electrochemically, providing an intermediate in terms of energy and power between traditional batteries and supercapacitors. Read More

 

bacteria

bacteria

Bacterial proteins transform iron and other minerals for energy, growth

Scientists review decades of work into bacterial proteins that transform iron and other minerals for energy and growth. Cleaning up polluted soil and growing crops for biofuels benefit from a deeper understanding of how microbes alter subsurface minerals. Read More

 

3-D printing

3-D printing

Research towards making 3-D printing thermoplastic from squids

Research team at Penn State is using squid to make a thermoplastic that can be used in 3-D printing. “Most of the companies looking into this type of material have focused on synthetic plastics. Read More

 

hydrogen into graphene

hydrogen into graphene

Turning hydrogen into “graphene”

New work from Carnegie’s Ivan Naumov and Russell Hemley delves into the chemistry underlying some surprising recent observations about hydrogen, and reveals remarkable parallels between hydrogen and graphene under extreme pressures Read More

 

sponges

sponges

New carbon-trapping ‘sponges’ could cut greenhouse gases

In the fight against global warming, carbon capture – chemically trapping carbon dioxide before it releases into the atmosphere – is gaining momentum, but standard methods are plagued by toxicity, Read More

 

 

Scientists create artificial chemical evolution


Cronin, University of Glasgow

Cronin, University of Glasgow

Scientists create ‘artificial chemical evolution’

Scientists have taken an important step towards the possibility of creating synthetic life with the development of a form of artificial evolution in a simple chemistry set without DNA. Read More

 

smart window

smart window

“Smart window” keeps heat out, conserves energy

Windows allow brilliant natural light to stream into homes and buildings. Along with light comes heat that, in warm weather, we often counter with energy-consuming air conditioning. Read More

 

Measuring methane emissions

Measuring methane emissions

Measuring methane emissions from natural gas

A team of researchers from the Cockrell School of Engineering at The University of Texas at Austin and environmental testing firm URS reported that a small subset of natural gas wells are responsible for the majority of methane emissions from two major sources – liquid unloadings and pneumatic controller equipment – at natural gas production sites. Read More

 

Carl Koch, NC state

Carl Koch, NC state

New “high-entropy” metal alloy with higher strength-to-weight ratio

Researchers from North Carolina State University and Qatar University have developed a new “high-entropy” metal alloy that has a higher strength-to-weight ratio than any other existing metal material. Read More

 

artificial skin

artificial skin

Artificial skin developed using traditional electronics

An artificial skin that wraps around a prosthetic hand and senses touch and warmth has been developed using traditional electronics. The flexible sensors array was demonstrated in a rat model, where signals were transmitted and sensed in the brain. Read More

 

 

Gut bacteria from worm can degrade plastics, finds study


Gut bacteria

Gut bacteria

Gut bacteria from worm can degrade plastics, finds study

Plastic is well-known for sticking around in the environment for years without breaking down, contributing significantly to litter and landfills. But scientists have now discovered that bacteria from the guts of a worm known to munch on food packaging can degrade polyethylene, the most common plastic. Read More

 

artificial leaf

artificial leaf

Research towards making “artificial leaf” to produce clean hydrogen fuel

For years, scientists have been pursuing “artificial leaf” technology, a green approach to making hydrogen fuel that copies plants’ ability to convert sunlight into a form of energy they can use. Now, one team reports progress toward a stand-alone system that lends itself to large-scale, low-cost production. Read More 

 

DNA Binding Protein Zinc

DNA Binding Protein Zinc

Newly developed nanoparticle cluster manufacturing technique using DNA binding protein

Researchers at KAIST developed a new manufacturing technique for size-controllable magnetic nanoparticle clusters (NPCs) using the zinc finger protein that specifically binds to target DNA sequence. The research by Hak-Sung Kim, Professor, Department of Biological Sciences, KAIST and doctoral candidate, Yiseul Ryu was published in Angewandte Chemie International Edition online. Read More

 

zeolite

zeolite

Zeolites net new carbon allotropes

Previously unknown carbon allotropes have been predicted by scientists exploring their links with well-known network topologies. The new structures are highly stable and transparent, some with larger optical band gaps than diamond. Advanced computational techniques are leading the search for new forms of carbon and other group 14 elements. Read More

 

bioplastics

bioplastics

Bioplastics production made much greener

Polylactic acid is a degradable plastic used mostly for packaging. To meet the rising demand, ETH researchers have developed an eco-friendly process to make large amounts of lactic acid from glycerol, a waste by-product in the production of biodiesel. Read More

Benzene Infographic


Benzene is an organic compound that is a colorless or light-yellow liquid that has a relatively high melting point. The word benzene derives historically from gum benzoin, sometimes called benjamin.

It is highly flammable, has a sweet odor and quickly evaporates into air. Its vapor is heavier than air, which makes it sink into low-lying areas. Benzene dissolves only slightly in water and floats on top of it.

Benzene is formed from both natural and man-made processes. Natural sources include volcanoes and forest fires. Benzene is also a natural constituent of crude oil and gasoline. Its most widely-produced derivatives include styrene, which is used to make polymers and plastics, phenol for resins and adhesives and cyclohexane, which is used to manufacture Nylon.

About 80% of benzene is consumed in the production of three chemicals, ethylbenzene, cumene, and cyclohexane. Its most widely produced derivative is ethylbenzene, precursor to styrene, which is used to make polymers and plastics.

Benzene Infographic

Benzene Infographic

View and Download Much Bigger Image here

global warming, Atmospheric carbon dioxide, synthetic enzymes, sniff toxic gases, ammonia batteries


ice

ice

New research shows link between global warmingand carbon emission

Research has identified, for the first time, how global warming is related to the amount of carbon emitted. A team of researchers from the universities of Southampton, Bristol and Liverpool have derived the first theoretical equation Read More 

Xiulei Ji, OSU

Xiulei Ji, OSU

Atmospheric carbon dioxide used for energy storage products

Chemists and engineers at Oregon State Universityhave discovered a fascinating new way to take some of the atmospheric carbon dioxide that’s causing the greenhouse effect and use it to make an advanced, high-value material for use in energy storage products. Read More

 

synthetic enzyme

synthetic enzyme

Scientists make synthetic enzymes

In a major breakthrough, scientists have for the first time made synthetic enzymes – the vital ingredients needed for life – from artificial genetic material that does not exist outside the laboratory. The milestone could soon lead to new ways of developing drugs and medical treatments. Read More

 

sniff toxic gases

sniff toxic gases

New method to sniff toxic gases from a distance

Scientists have developed a way to sniff out tiny amounts of toxic gases – a whiff of nerve gas, for example, or a hint of a chemical spill – from up to one kilometer away. Read More

 

waste heat

waste heat

Low-grade waste heat regenerates ammonia batteries

According to Penn State engineers, an efficient method to harvest low-grade waste heat as electricity may be possible using reversible ammonia batteries. Read More