Nasal spray may treat Alzheimer’s, say scientists


Nasal spray may treat Alzheimer’s, say scientists

Nasal spray

Nasal spray

A nasal spray that contains a man-made form of insulin may improve working memory and other mental capabilities in adults with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer’s, scientists have found. The study led by researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center studied 60 adults diagnosed with amnesic mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or mild to moderate Alzheimer’s dementia (AD). Read More

 

New catalyst process for rapid polymerization uses light, not metal

rapid polymerization

rapid polymerization

University of California Santa Barbara researchers develop a metal-free atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) process that uses an organic-based photocatalyst. A team of chemistry and materials science experts from University of California, Santa Barbara and The Dow Chemical Company has created a novel way to overcome one of the major hurdles preventing the widespread use of controlled radical polymerization. Read More 

 

‘Nanowire’ crystals with superconducting properties developed

Nanowire’ crystal

Nanowire’ crystal

A new type of ‘nanowire’ crystals that fuses semiconducting and metallic materials on the atomic scale could lay the foundation for future semiconducting electronics. Researchers at the University of Copenhagen are behind the breakthrough, published inNature Materials, which has great potential. Read More 

 

Researchers use glass for battery electrode

battery electrode

battery electrode

Today’s lithium-ion batteries are good, but not good enough if our future energy system is to rely on electrical power. Chemists and materials scientists at ETH Zurich have developed a type of glass that can be used as an electrode material in lithium-ion batteries – likely making a vast improvement in these batteries’ capacity and energy density. Read More 

 

Super-dipoles

Super-dipoles

Super-dipoles linked to chloroform’s outstanding solvent properties

Super-dipoles uncovered in chloroform by chemists in the UK could explain the solvent’s powerful ability to dissolve a large range of substances at high concentrations.  Read More 

 

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